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Dorcas gazelle

Isabelline gazelle Dorcas gazelle ssp.  Pelzeln's gazelle

Gazella dorcas (Linnaeus, 1758)
French: Gazelle dorcas; La Dorcas
German: Dorkasgazelle
Arabic: Ghazel, Rhazal, Afri

Endemic subspecies
Gazella dorcas beccarii de Beaux, 1931
Gazella dorcas isabella Gray, 1846 (Isabelline gazelle)
Gazella [dorcas] pelzelni Kohl, 1886 (Pelzeln's gazelle)


Description
Total length: 90 - 110 cm
Tail length: 15 - 20 cm
Shoulder height: 55 - 65 cm
Weight: 15 - 20 kg
Gestation: 169 - 181 days

The smallest gazelle but proportionally the longest limbed, with small, fine hooves. It is notable for its very long ears. Horns, on both sexes, are medium-length (up to 38 cm), with up to 25 annual rings, and lyre-shaped (out then in at the tips). The horns are shorter, slighter and less curved in females. The colour is light sandy fawn and pale with poorly differentiated flank stripes but light and dark streaks down the face.

Distribution
G. d. beccarii: Eritrean uplands
G. d. isabella: Eritrea, Ethiopia, E Sudan
G. [d.] pelzelni: N Somali coast, Djibouti, Ethiopia?

Ecology
They live in small herds rarely containing more than 20 members, but larger groups may form during certain seasons when movement is stimulated towards fresh vegetation growth following the rains. These gazelles browse and graze on almost any vegetation (incl. succulents), especially acacia. They drink if water is available.

Conservation Status

Endangered or exterminated in many localities but still widespread over much of its range. Not endangered overall.

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1: For NE-Africa, the (sub-)species may not be threatened.

- http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8969/0

Trend:
Some populations may increase. There is no current data available for many regions. Listed on CMS Appendix I and included in the CMS Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes Action Plan. Legally protected or partially so in several range states. Dorcas Gazelle occur in many protected areas throughout their range, including Mille-Sardo Wildlife Reserve in Ethiopia.

European Collection Plan (2003): ...
RCP status: EEP, Teresa Abáigar, EEZA, Almería

CITES:
Appendix III (Tunisia, Algeria)

Recommendations
Dorcas gazelle do well in captivity, and are particularly common in several privately owned, captive collections in the Middle East (most originating from Egypt, the horn of Africa and Sudan). Additionally, there is a well-managed captive population in Almeria (Spain), originating from Western Saharan stock.

Literature
Abaigar T (2005): Taxonomy of Dorcas Gazelle (Gazella dorcas) subspecies. Report in Monfort S & Correll T (eds): Fifth Annual Sahelo-Saharan Interest Group Meeting, 30-32.
Bedeuls RC, Devillers P, Lafontaine R-M, Devillers-Terschuren J & Beudels M-O (Editors) (2006): Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. Status and Perspectives. Report on the conservation status of the six Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. CMS SSA Concerted Action. 2nd edition. CMS Technical Series Publication No. 11, UNEP/CMS Secretariat, Bonn.
Butynski T (1995): Eritrea. Gnusletter, 1: 11.
Dorst J & Dandelot P (1970): Larger Mammals of Africa, Collins Field Guide, London.
East R (1999): African Antelope Databese 1998. IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
Haltenorth T & Diller H (1977): Saeugetiere Afrikas und Madagaskars, BLV Verlagsgesellschaft, Muenchen. 
Kingdon J (1997): The Kingdon Field Guide To African Mammals, Academic Press, San Diego.
Künzel T, Künzel S & Rayaleh HA (2001): Djibouti. IUCN-ASG Antelope Survey Update, Feb 2001, (8): 23-28.
Schloeder C et al (1997): Ethiopia. IUCN-ASG Antelope Survey Update, Sept 1997, 23-49.
Wilson DE & Reeder DM (2005): Mammal species of the world. A taxonomic and geographic reference. Third Ed., Vol. 1 The John Hopkins University Press, Balitmore.

 

Links

- http://www.saharaconservation.org/spip.php?page=wildlife_fiche&id_article=99
- http://www.ultimateungulate.com/Artiodactyla/Gazella_dorcas.html
- http://www.arkive.org/dorcas-gazelle/gazella-dorcas/
- http://awwp.alwabra.com/index.php/content/view/1441/34/
- http://www.gisbau.uniroma1.it/amd/amd165b.html


 

Dorcas gazelle

Gazella dorcas beccarii de Beaux, 1931

Other endemic subspecies
Gazella dorcas isabella
Gazella [dorcas] pelzelni

Description
Total length: 90 - 110 cm
Tail length: 15 - 20 cm
Shoulder height: 55 - 65 cm
Weight: 15 - 20 kg
Gestation: 169 - 181 days

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1:

- http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8969/0

Trend: ?
It is known to occur in Nakfa and Yob Wildlife Reserves in the northwest. No recent informations available on the population sizes.

Recommendations
None.

Dorcas gazelle details ... (http://www.neaasg.org/index.php?id=315)

Literature
Bedeuls RC, Devillers P, Lafontaine R-M, Devillers-Terschuren J & Beudels M-O (Editors) (2006): Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. Status and Perspectives. Report on the conservation status of the six Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. CMS SSA Concerted Action. 2nd edition. CMS Technical Series Publication No. 11, UNEP/CMS Secretariat, Bonn.


 

Isabelline gazelle

Gazella dorcas isabella Gray, 1846

Other endemic subspecies
Gazella dorcas beccarii
Gazella [dorcas] pelzelni

Description
Total length: 90 - 110 cm
Tail length: 15 - 20 cm
Shoulder height: 55 - 65 cm
Weight: 15 - 20 kg
Gestation: 169 - 181 days

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1:

- http://www.neaasg.org/index.php?id=321

Trend: ?
The Recent surveys have indicated that it is still common in the Red Sea Hills in Sudan. In Ethiopia it was not observed in recent aerial and ground surveys in Yangudi N.P., but a population of several thousand is estimated to occur in the adjacent Mille-Serdo reserve in Danakil desert to the north. No information is available on the status of it in the northwest, but given estimated numbers and tribal stability in the Nille-Serdo/Danakil area, the species presently appears to be stable and not threatened.

Recommendations
There are protected areas within the range of this subspecies in Sudan. Survey and protection of remnant populations and habitat in the desert and sub-desert regions of the northwestern section of the country are priority actions for conservation action. Specifically, planning and development of the proposed Wadi Howar N.P. would be a major step towards regional restoration and protection of the species. In Ethiopia priorities for conservation of Dorcas gazelle and other wildlife were to enhance in the 1980s to enhance the capacity of Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Agency, through international support, and to develop the existing framework of conservation areas into an effective protected area system. Planning to improve protected area management has begun, but implementation of action has not. In the case of the Dorcas gazelle, development of the Mille-Sardo Wildlife Reserve and Yangudi N.P. are priorities.

Dorcas gazelle details ... (http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8969/0)

Literature
Bedeuls RC, Devillers P, Lafontaine R-M, Devillers-Terschuren J & Beudels M-O (Editors) (2006): Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. Status and Perspectives. Report on the conservation status of the six Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes. CMS SSA Concerted Action. 2nd edition. CMS Technical Series Publication No. 11, UNEP/CMS Secretariat, Bonn.


 

Pelzeln's gazelle

Male
 
Female Juvenile
 
 Male  Male  Female

Gazella [dorcas] pelzelni (Kohl, 1886)
F: Gazelle de Pelzeln
G: Pelzelngazelle

Other endemic subspecies
Gazella dorcas beccarii
Gazella dorcas isabella

Description
Total length: 90 - 110 cm
Tail length: 15 - 20 cm
Shoulder height: 55 - 65 cm
Weight: 15 - 20 kg
Gestation: 169 - 181 days

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1:

- http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8969/0

Trend: ?
In Djibouti its numbers appear to be stable, at least in the southeast. The Pelzeln population has substantially increased since Djibouti‟s independence in 1977 and seems to be stable at a relatively high level. The hunting ban is the most important reason for the positive development. A further significant increase of the Dorcas population in Djibouti however seems to be unlikely because of competition with the high number of livestock and trade with young animals is reported. Among all wild ungulate species occurring in Djibouti, beside the Salt‟s dikdik, the Pelzeln gazelle appears to be least threatened one. A small but reproducing captive population, founder is consisting of orphaned or confiscated individuals exists in the privately run rescue centre DECAN located at the outskirts of Djibouti ville. In Somalia it still occupied a large part of its range in the 1990s and was locally common.

Recommendations
None.

Dorcas gazelle details ... (http://www.neaasg.org/index.php?id=315)

Literature
East R (1999): African Antelope Databese 1998. IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
Heckel J-O & Rayaleh HA (2008): Status of wild ungulates in Djibouti. Report in Woodfine T & Wacher T: Ninth Annual Sahelo-Saharan Interest Group meeting, 19-24.
Laurent A & Laurent D (2002): Djibouti - Les mammifères d'híer à aujrd'hui por demain. Ed. BEIRA. CFP. Toulouse.
Künzel T et al. (2001): Status Survey on Djibouti Wildlife. Gnusletter, 1: 19-23.
Künzel T, Rayaleh HA & Künzel S (2000): Status Assessment Survey on Wildlife in Djibouti. Final Report December 2000. A project by the Zoological Society for the Conservation of Species and Populations (ZSCSP), Germany.

 

Links

- http://awwp.alwabra.com/index.php/content/view/1371/34/

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