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Lesser kudu

Tragelaphus imberbis (Blyth, 1869)
French: Le petit Koudou
German: Kleiner Kudu
Swahili: Tandala ndogo

Endemic subspecies (not valid according to Wilson & Reeder, 2005)
Tragelaphus imberbis imberbis

Description
Total length: 110 - 175 cm
Tail length: 25 - 40 cm
Shoulder: height 90 - 110 cm
Weight: (f) 56 - 70 kg, (m) 92 - 108 kg
Gestation: 222 days

The hornless females and young are bright russet, with 11-15 vertical white stripes. They have a long, narrow head and resemble Nyala very closely, except for slightly longer legs and neck. Yearling males acquire sandy-grey colouring that is almost identical to that of similarly aged Nyala males. Although the males of both species darken with age, Lesser kudu remain well-camouflaged by their colouring. The short sparsely haired neck has geometric white markings on throat and chest.

Distribution
T. i. imberbis: Horn of Africa; E, SE, S Ethiopia (up to 1.300 m), Somalia, SE Sudan

Ecology
This antelope, the most slender of all the Tragelaphines, is a small version of the Greater kudu. It inhabits dorn-bush country with acacia thickets, dense shrub and bush in semi-arid regions and is water-independant. The Lesser kudu lives in pairs or family groups. They are very shy. Lesser kudus are essentially browsers, they feed on leaves, young shoots and twigs. Their call is a loud bark.

Conservation Status
Extreme alertness and shyness protect this species from predators (and conceal them from would-be assessors of their status). Animals are wholly dependent on their habitat remaining relatively closed and even benefit from overgrazing that suppresses fire. As a widespread but patchily distributed species. Overall not endangered. However, it seems to have disappeared of much of its former range in Somalia.

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1:

- http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22053/0

Trend:
There are no current data available for many regions. The Lesser kudu population appears to be stable in Ethiopia including the Ogaden region. About one-third of the estimated total population occurs in protected areas. Important populations occur in such as Awash, Omo and Mago National Parks in Ethiopia and Bush Bush N.P. in Somalia. The status of the Lesser kudu in Djibouti is uncertain but likely to be extinct due to the lack of reliable proof for its existence in the past decade.

European Collection Plan (2003): ...
RCP status: ESB, Pavel Moucha, Dvur Kralove, establsihed 1997

Recommendations
The Lesser Kudu's long-term survival prospects would be enhanced by improved protection and management of relatively few protected areas wich support substanstial populations. In addition, its value as a trophy animal gives the species high potential for increased revenue generation in the extensive bushland where it still occurs in good numbers outside national parks and equivalent reserves.

Literature
Dorst J & Dandelot P (1970): Larger Mammals of Africa, Collins Field Guide, London.
East R (1999): African Antelope Database 1998. IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
Haltenorth T & Diller H (1997): Saeugetiere Afrikas und Madagaskars, BLV Verlagsgesellschaft, Muenchen.
Heckel J-O & Rayaleh HA (2008): Status of wild ungulates in Djibouti. Report in Woodfine T & Wacher T: Ninth Annual Sahelo-Saharan Interest Group meeting, 19-24.
Kingdon J (1997): The Kingdon Field Guide To African Mammals, Academic Press, San Diego.
Schloeder C et al. (1997): Ethiopia. IUCN-ASG Antelope Survey Update, Sep 1997, 6: 3-49.
Thouless C (1996): Aerial Survey for Wildlife in Omo Valley, Chew Bahir and Borana Areas of Southern Ethiopia. Gnusletter, 1: 20-25.
Wilhelmi F, Kaariye XY, Hammer S, Hammer C & Heckel J-O (2006): ON THE STATUS OF WILD UNGULATES IN THE OGADEN REGION OF ETHIOPIA. Proceedings of the seventh annual SSIG meeting, 43-62.
Wilson DE & Reeder DM (2005): Mammal species of the world. A taxonomic and geographic reference. Third Ed., Vol. 1. The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.

 

Links

- http://www.ultimateungulate.com/Artiodactyla/Tragelaphus_imberbis.html
- http://www.arkive.org/lesser-kudu/tragelaphus-imberbis/
- http://www.stlzoo.org/animals/abouttheanimals/mammals/hoofedmammals/lesserkudu.htm
- http://www.zoodirektoren.de/staticsite/staticsite.php?menuid=312&topmenu=163&keepmenu=inactive
- http://www.gisbau.uniroma1.it/amd/amd221b.html


 

Lesser Kudu

Tragelaphus imberbis imberbis
French: Le Petit Koudou
German: Kleiner Kudu

Other endemic subspecies
There are no other endemic subspecies.

Description
Total length: 110 - 175 cm
Tail length: 25 - 40 cm
Shoulder height: 90 - 110 cm
Weight: (f) 56 - 70 kg, 92 - 108 kg
Gestation: 222 days

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Category, ver 3.1:

- http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/22053/0

Trend: ?
About one-third of the estimated total population occurs in protected areas. Important populations occur in such as Awash, Omo and Mago National Parks in Ethiopia and Bush Bush N.P. in Somalia. The status of the Lesser kudu in Djibouti is uncertain but likely to be extinct due to the lack of reliable proof for its existence in the past decade.

Recommendations
The Lesser Kudu's long-term survival prospects would be enhanced by improved protection and management of relatively few protected areas wich support substanstial populations. In addition, its value as a trophy animal gives the species high potential for increased revenue generation in the extensive bushland where it still occurs in good numbers outside national parks and equivalent reserves.

Lesser Kudu details ... (http://www.neaasg.org/index.php?id=254)

Literature
East R (1999): African Antelope Database 1998. IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
Heckel J-O & Rayaleh HA (2008): Status of wild ungulates in Djibouti. Report in Woodfine T & Wacher T: Ninth Annual Sahelo-Saharan Interest Group meeting, 19-24.

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